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Christmas Bells
HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW I heard the bells...

A Christmas Hymn
ALFRED DOMETT It was the calm and silent nig...

The Queerest Christmas
GRACE MARGARET GALLAHER BETTY stood at her door, g...

The Fir Tree
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN Out in the forest stood a pr...

Keeping Christmas
Romans, xiv, 6: _He that regardeth the day, regardeth i...

Old Christmas Returned
All you that to feasting and mirth are inclined, ...

Christmas Carol
As Joseph was a-waukin' He heard an angel si...





Mark Well My Heavy Doleful Tale






ANONYMOUS

Mark well my heavy doleful tale,
For Twelfth-day now is come,
And now I must no longer sing,
And say no words but mum;
For I perforce must take my leave
Of all my dainty cheer,
Plum-porridge, roast beef, and minced pies,
My strong ale and my beer.

Kind-hearted Christmas, now adieu,
For I with thee must part,
And for to take my leave of thee
Doth grieve me at the heart;
Thou wert an ancient housekeeper,
And mirth with meat didst keep,
But thou art going out of town,
Which makes me for to weep.

God knoweth whether I again
Thy merry face shall see,
Which to good-fellows and the poor
That was so frank and free.
Thou lovedst pastime with thy heart,
And eke good company;
Pray hold me up for fear I swoon,
For I am like to die.

Come, butler, fill a brimmer up
To cheer my fainting heart,
That to old Christmas I may drink
Before he doth depart;
And let each one that's in this room
With me likewise condole,
And for to cheer their spirits sad
Let each one drink a bowl.

And when the same it hath gone round
Then fall unto your cheer,
For you do know that Christmas time
It comes but once a year.
But this good draught which I have drunk
Hath comforted my heart,
For I was very fearful that
My stomach would depart.

Thanks to my master and my dame
That doth such cheer afford;
God bless them, that each Christmas they
May furnish thus their board.
My stomach having come to me,
I mean to have a bout,
Intending to eat most heartily;
Good friends, I do not flout.





Next: A Christmas Carol

Previous: Keeping Christmas



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